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BTLT in the News, “Head of Tide Park connects Topsham to river’s offerings”

“Head of Tide Park connects Topsham to river’s offerings”

August 8, 2018

Looking to run in the woods or go for a paddle? Check out this article in The Coastal Journal that highlights the great running trails and water opportunities at Head of Tide Park.

The recent opening of Head of Tide Park is the culmination of a 12-year process to enhance the beauty, acquire land, and create a recreation area unique to Topsham. The work of the town and community organizations resulted in the town’s newest summer attraction.

“It really was a community effort,” said Parks and Recreation Director Pam Leduc. “It’s amazing when you look back at what it was and then now the finished product.”

The 12-acre park has a history of bustling activity, with a saw mill and then feldspar mill once standing on the land. Neglected apartment buildings made way for serenity and the gentle splash of a waterfall at the park.
Its history, however, is still a part of the landscape, as anyone passing by on Cathance Road can see the unmistakable ball mill.

While exploring the trails and nature of the park, signs have been installed to further pay tribute to the land, dating back to the tribes of the Abenakis. Leduc is most excited for residents and visitors in Topsham to have a place to connect with the river.

“It’s a nice quiet place to go for a picnic or kayaking,” said Leduc. “The Cathance itself is very mysterious.”

Runners will also enjoy what the new community get-away has to offer. The park has a trailhead that connects to more than seven miles of trails.

 

To read the rest of the story, click here.

 

BTLT in the News, “Head of Tide Park, and the 12-year saga of how it came to be”

“Head of Tide Park, and the 12-year saga of how it came to be”

July 1, 2018

Angela Twitchell and Pam LeDuc joined Mary Pols at Head of Tide Park to delve into the details of the newly opened park in Topsham.

Unless they are avid readers of the local land trust’s newsletter, the picnickers would be unlikely to know it took 12 years, at least 11 funders, multiple land purchases, easements granted by neighbors, rounds of grant writing and applications, and coordination among federal, state and local agencies – including the local fire department – to make it happen. Head of Tide Park looks like it has been part of the Topsham landscape forever, but it has been officially open only for a month.

How it came to be is a classic tale of American land conservation, a lot of patience and a vision to see beyond mildewed buildings and into a day like this one, where a family is picnicking, a man on a bicycle stops to sit in the shade, another reads a sign explaining the history of the place and two women launch a kayak to head upstream, into what had been secret to many – the beauty of a place where the tides from Merrymeeting Bay push deep into the land to meet the fresh water of the Cathance River.

Water cascades over rocks where the Cathance River meets Merrymeeting Bay at the Head of Tide Park in Topsham. It took 12 years to carve The town’s first waterfront park. Now the whole park is owned by Topsham, with a conservation easement held by the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust. Staff photos by Gregory Rec

To read the rest of the story, click here.

Head of Tide Park Community History Forum

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  • June 2, 2018
    10:30 am - 11:30 am

As part of our day long celebration of the grand opening of Head of Tide Park, we invite you to join us for a muffin and forum on the unique and diverse history of the Park. June 2, 10:30am Topsham Town Hall Hear local historians will describe the pre-history, early settlement, milling, and community conservation (more…)

Head of Tide Park Grand Opening

We're sorry, but all tickets sales have ended because the event is expired.

  • June 2, 2018
    12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Join Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust and the Town of Topsham for a celebration of Topsham’s first waterfront park on the Cathance River. After over a decade in the making, Head of Tide Park is now permanently conserved and will provide river and trail access, picnicking, watershed protection, and a beautiful scenic vista for the residents and (more…)

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