Posts

Flight Deck Brewing

From Cook’s Corner, head west on Bath Road. Take a left on to Admiral Fitch Ave, travel 0.8 miles and then turn right onto Pegasus Street. Flight Deck will be on your left.

Construction Area at Cathance River Nature Preserve

Attention Hikers

Trails in Construction Area and Parking Changes

Due to construction, the intersection of the Highland Trail, River Access Trail, and Cathance River Trail (West and East) is flagged and off limits in some areas. Please proceed through the openings in the flagging as indicated by the arrows below to continue to the Preserve trails, avoid areas where access is flagged off, and use caution while passing through this area.

During this time hikers are directed to park at the Ecology Center parking instead of Hiker Parking. Please park thoughtfully to ensure that you are far enough off the road and to accommodate as many cars as possible. If the Ecology Center parking area is full, additional parking can be found at the Community Center.

Please contact the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust at 729-7694 if you have any questions and thank you for your patience during this time!

BTLT in the News, “Harpswell, Brunswick join the Dempsey Challenge”

Harpswell, Brunswick join the Dempsey Challenge

September 26, 2018

The Dempsey Challenge is coming through Brunswick on Sunday! To learn more, read the latest story on the Challenge by the Forecaster.

As part of its 10th anniversary this weekend, the Dempsey Challenge has devised a new cycling route that includes Brunswick and Harpswell.

The Dempsey Challenge Sept. 29 and 30 is an annual two-day, non-competitive run, walk and cycling fundraiser. Proceeds go to Dempsey Centers, an organization founded by actor Patrick Dempsey to help Mainers and their families impacted by cancer.

To read more, click here.

The Messenger Film Screening

We're sorry, but all tickets sales have ended because the event is expired.

  • April 25, 2019
    7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Join us for a film screening of “The Messenger” with Freeport Wild Bird Supply on April 25, 2019 at Frontier in Brunswick. The 90 minute film will begin at 7pm. Purchase  your  ticket  for  this  event  by  clicking  here. Su Rynard’s wide-ranging and contemplative documentary THE MESSENGER explores our deep-seated connection to birds and warns (more…)

Woodward Cove Trail Opens Up

By Connor Rockett

A little over two weeks ago, the land stewards from BTLT and Kennebec Estuary Land Trust completed a new trail for public use at the Woodward Cove property, located on Gurnet Road in Brunswick. After multiple scouting visits and a surprise discovery of some (very large) poison ivy patches, we cut a winding, lollipop-shaped route just under a mile long. A relatively short trail featuring gentle hills, an upturned rootmass, and apple trees, it is a wonderful spot to spend a few moments in peaceful reflection or to stretch the legs and get some fresh air after a long day.  All of us at the Land Trust are glad to see this trail open to the community and we hope you will enjoy it!

As I mentioned earlier, the unexpected appearance of poison ivy posed some problems. After having scouted and flagged an initial route, Margaret and I returned a week before the planned start of trail cutting only to find that an expansive patch had sprung up. It was unclear whether we would be able to build the trail. In what ended up being a great example of the creative problem solving involved in stewardship work, we devised a new route that included the interesting features of the property, all while avoiding sensitive wetland areas and the poison ivy.

The problem solving process was simple but effective: people observing, thinking, and communicating to find a better route. All that it entailed was 5 of us working on the ground, weighing options, relying on past experiences, and envisioning alternatives. That collaborative creativity allowed us to avoid the poison ivy, without having to resort to using costly and disruptive herbicides. It was place-based problem solving for community wellness in action (wooh!). So that being said, the next time you’re out on the Woodward Cove trail, hopefully you’ll be reminded of just how much can be accomplished by a small group of ordinary people with a common goal in mind!

BTLT in the News, “Maine Voices: Maine Land Trust Network helps support ‘the way life should be'”

Maine Voices: Maine Land Trust Network helps support ‘the way life should be’

February 9, 2018

Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust is featured in the Portland Press Herald today! Angela Twitchell, BTLT Executive Director, and Nick Ullo, Boothbay Region Land Trust Executive Director, wrote this informative article on the many benefits of Land Trusts in Maine.

“The Legislature’s Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry Committee has been studying Maine land trusts since October. As leaders of the Maine Land Trust Network, we welcome the study and the chance to highlight the many ways we make Maine “the way life should be.”

Last summer, the Maine Land Trust Network surveyed our members and published the findings in a report titled “Land Trusts Work for Maine.” This report highlights the most important benefits that land trusts contribute to our local communities and to the state. For example, hikers can explore more than 1,250 miles of trails that wind through land trust properties in every corner of Maine. These range from family-friendly nature paths in communities like Freeport, to more challenging routes ending atop bald summits in rural corners of Oxford County, and everything in between. Motorized recreational enthusiasts also benefit from Maine’s statewide collection of land trust conserved lands, which are home to over 345 miles of ATV trails and 570 miles of snowmobile trails.”

To read more of the article, click here.

Venues

Flight Deck Brewing

From Cook’s Corner, head west on Bath Road. Take a left on to Admiral Fitch Ave, travel 0.8 miles and then turn right onto Pegasus Street. Flight Deck will be on your left.

Construction Area at Cathance River Nature Preserve

Attention Hikers

Trails in Construction Area and Parking Changes

Due to construction, the intersection of the Highland Trail, River Access Trail, and Cathance River Trail (West and East) is flagged and off limits in some areas. Please proceed through the openings in the flagging as indicated by the arrows below to continue to the Preserve trails, avoid areas where access is flagged off, and use caution while passing through this area.

During this time hikers are directed to park at the Ecology Center parking instead of Hiker Parking. Please park thoughtfully to ensure that you are far enough off the road and to accommodate as many cars as possible. If the Ecology Center parking area is full, additional parking can be found at the Community Center.

Please contact the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust at 729-7694 if you have any questions and thank you for your patience during this time!

BTLT in the News, “Harpswell, Brunswick join the Dempsey Challenge”

Harpswell, Brunswick join the Dempsey Challenge

September 26, 2018

The Dempsey Challenge is coming through Brunswick on Sunday! To learn more, read the latest story on the Challenge by the Forecaster.

As part of its 10th anniversary this weekend, the Dempsey Challenge has devised a new cycling route that includes Brunswick and Harpswell.

The Dempsey Challenge Sept. 29 and 30 is an annual two-day, non-competitive run, walk and cycling fundraiser. Proceeds go to Dempsey Centers, an organization founded by actor Patrick Dempsey to help Mainers and their families impacted by cancer.

To read more, click here.

The Messenger Film Screening

Join us for a film screening of “The Messenger” with Freeport Wild Bird Supply on April 25, 2019 at Frontier in Brunswick. The 90 minute film will begin at 7pm. Purchase  your  ticket  for  this  event  by  clicking  here.

Su Rynard’s wide-ranging and contemplative documentary THE MESSENGER explores our deep-seated connection to birds and warns that the uncertain fate of songbirds might mirror our own. Moving from the northern reaches of the Boreal Forest to the base of Mount Ararat in Turkey to the streets of New York, THE MESSENGER brings us face-to-face with a remarkable variety of human-made perils that have devastated thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, grosbeaks and many other airborne music-makers.

On one level, THE MESSENGER is an engaging, visually stunning, emotional journey, one that mixes its elegiac message with hopeful notes and unique glances into the influence of songbirds on our own expressions of the soul. On another level, THE MESSENGER is the artful story about the mass depletion of songbirds on multiple continents, and about those who are working to turn the tide.

In ancient times humans looked to the flight and songs of birds to protect the future. Today once again, birds have something to tell us.

About Freeport Wild Bird Supply:

Since 2004, Freeport Wild Bird Supply has been more than just a location to buy birdseed, but also a destination for all bird enthusiasts. Take a seat in front of our window, and watch some birds! A fully stocked feeding station is situated just outside our window, nestled in a diverse native plant garden, planned with birds and ecology in mind. You never know what might visit our garden; from many of our resident birds to the occasional vagrant such as Lark and Clay-colored Sparrows and Dickcissels, all of which have been seen here. Our butterfly and hummingbird garden features a selection of flowers that attract these beautiful creatures. Come see what’s blooming, and what’s feeding on those blooms!

 

This film screening is a Spring Birding Extravaganza Event. The Spring Birding Extravaganza is a free series of birding events held in partnership with Kennebec Estuary Land Trust and Harpswell Heritage Land Trust.  Read more about this annual series at btlt.org/spring-birding-2019.

Woodward Cove Trail Opens Up

By Connor Rockett

A little over two weeks ago, the land stewards from BTLT and Kennebec Estuary Land Trust completed a new trail for public use at the Woodward Cove property, located on Gurnet Road in Brunswick. After multiple scouting visits and a surprise discovery of some (very large) poison ivy patches, we cut a winding, lollipop-shaped route just under a mile long. A relatively short trail featuring gentle hills, an upturned rootmass, and apple trees, it is a wonderful spot to spend a few moments in peaceful reflection or to stretch the legs and get some fresh air after a long day.  All of us at the Land Trust are glad to see this trail open to the community and we hope you will enjoy it!

As I mentioned earlier, the unexpected appearance of poison ivy posed some problems. After having scouted and flagged an initial route, Margaret and I returned a week before the planned start of trail cutting only to find that an expansive patch had sprung up. It was unclear whether we would be able to build the trail. In what ended up being a great example of the creative problem solving involved in stewardship work, we devised a new route that included the interesting features of the property, all while avoiding sensitive wetland areas and the poison ivy.

The problem solving process was simple but effective: people observing, thinking, and communicating to find a better route. All that it entailed was 5 of us working on the ground, weighing options, relying on past experiences, and envisioning alternatives. That collaborative creativity allowed us to avoid the poison ivy, without having to resort to using costly and disruptive herbicides. It was place-based problem solving for community wellness in action (wooh!). So that being said, the next time you’re out on the Woodward Cove trail, hopefully you’ll be reminded of just how much can be accomplished by a small group of ordinary people with a common goal in mind!

BTLT in the News, “Maine Voices: Maine Land Trust Network helps support ‘the way life should be'”

Maine Voices: Maine Land Trust Network helps support ‘the way life should be’

February 9, 2018

Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust is featured in the Portland Press Herald today! Angela Twitchell, BTLT Executive Director, and Nick Ullo, Boothbay Region Land Trust Executive Director, wrote this informative article on the many benefits of Land Trusts in Maine.

“The Legislature’s Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry Committee has been studying Maine land trusts since October. As leaders of the Maine Land Trust Network, we welcome the study and the chance to highlight the many ways we make Maine “the way life should be.”

Last summer, the Maine Land Trust Network surveyed our members and published the findings in a report titled “Land Trusts Work for Maine.” This report highlights the most important benefits that land trusts contribute to our local communities and to the state. For example, hikers can explore more than 1,250 miles of trails that wind through land trust properties in every corner of Maine. These range from family-friendly nature paths in communities like Freeport, to more challenging routes ending atop bald summits in rural corners of Oxford County, and everything in between. Motorized recreational enthusiasts also benefit from Maine’s statewide collection of land trust conserved lands, which are home to over 345 miles of ATV trails and 570 miles of snowmobile trails.”

To read more of the article, click here.

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria