4,600+ Pounds of Blueberries Harvested to be Donated to Good Shepherd, Preble Street, and Indigenous communities throughout Maine

By Lydia Coburn, BTLT Communications Coordinator

The morning of Friday August 5th I headed out to Crystal Spring Farm to witness something truly exceptional. 

As I walked through the forested trails, the trees provided great shade on one of these hot summer days we’ve had so many of. I rounded the corner, to what opens up to the blueberry barrens. It doesn’t look like much, but I knew it held a deep history, unique ecology, and great potential for giving. 

These fields have existed for thousands of years, with the blueberry plants living deep beneath the ground, sending shoots up to the surface each summer.

What I stood upon was a Sandplain Grassland – a natural ecological community ranked as “critically imperiled” by the Maine Natural Areas Program. The 21 sandy acres that are part of Crystal Spring Farm were deposited by rivers of glacial meltwater about 13,000 years ago, and are superb for the growth of low-bush blueberries, among other unique plant species. Since conserving the blueberry barren, BTLT has conducted two controlled burns to support the grassland vegetation and rare species that depend on this imperiled habitat. The most recent burn in spring 2021 on 14 acres of the blueberry barren proved to be extremely beneficial, as the wild blueberries are thriving this season! 

BTLT summer intern Cora Spelke and and Seth Kroeck of Maquoit Wild Blueberries/Crystal Spring Farm.

Even before I truly entered the barren, I could see multiple families crouched over with containers in their hands, and smiles on their faces. Both families remarked at just how abundant the fields were this season! But the true reason for my visit was a bit further past the “no blueberry picking beyond this point” sign. Lured by the sounds of a tractor, I made my way over to Seth Kroeck of Maquoit Wild Blueberries/Crystal Spring Farm and BTLT summer intern Cora Spelke who were hard at work harvesting crate after crate of blueberries. 

During one of his daily walks earlier this summer, Seth, who leases the land abutting Crystal Spring Farm for organic commercial blueberry production, noticed that the blueberries that had been recently burned were looking good – really good. Blueberries (and fruit) are far less frequently donated to food banks and folks who are food insecure because of their short shelf life, high commercial value that many farmers depend on, and the fees that come with processing and freezing fruit to preserve it. While looking at the bumper blueberry crop at Crystal Spring Farm however, Seth saw an opportunity to bring together organizations to harvest and donate blueberries from just a small portion of the barrens at Crystal Spring Farm while still leaving plenty of the delicious berries for wildlife and the community for u-pick. 

Working in 60 inch passes, the tractor grazes along the wild landscape harvesting blueberries.The organic average for harvesting is about 1,000 pounds per acre.

Due to the impressive bounty of berries this season, Seth’s objective was to mechanically harvest as many pounds as they could by mid-day from 3.5 acres that were set aside by BTLT for donation. By the time I arrived, they had been out there for an hour or so, and already had quite a few crates filled with blueberries. Seth predicted they’d harvest at least 2,000 pounds by the end of the day. Once harvested, the crates would be packed up and sent to a hub in Union, Maine where they would be consolidated. Next, off to be processed and frozen in Ellsworth, via Merrill Blueberries. After their long journey, these blueberries will be donated to families and individuals experiencing food insecurity through Good Shepherd and Preble Street as well as to Indigenous communities throughout Maine.

Each crate weighs about 22 pounds – during the consolidation process, about 13-15% of that weight is lost due to finding smashed berries, sticks, leaves, etc.

It was quite a sight to see – just a few folks, one tractor, and acres of hilly-landscape with the potential to feed. The very next day, I received an email from Seth informing me that they completed the task around 4:00 pm, with a whopping 4,655 pounds harvested! It’s an amazing cycle to ponder, from the burn, to new growth, to prosperity, to sharing. What an incredible natural landscape we have the honor of tending to and caring for, and the land returns the favor ten-fold. 

The different shades, sizes, and flavors of berries are different variations of the plant being expressed in slightly different ways.

Celebrating National Farmers’ Market Week!

Join us this Saturday at the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust Saturday Farmers’ Market at Crystal Spring Farm to celebrate National Farmers’ Market Week! Now in its 23rd year, National Farmers Market Week is an annual celebration that highlights the vital role farmers markets play in the nation’s food system. Amidst global change, it is now more important than ever to showcase the importance of farmers markets in our communities.

A key aspect of our mission as an organization is supporting local agriculture and commitment to strengthening our local food system. The BTLT Saturday Market plays an integral part in building community relationships around food and supporting our local agriculture, aquaculture, bakers, makers, and producers!

Be sure to stop by the BTLT info booth to enter our raffle or pick up a new scavenger hunt for the kiddos! We will be raffling off some fun prizes including BTLT merch, vouchers to spend at the Market, and tickets to the Common Ground Fair. To enter the raffle, simply head to the BTLT booth to have a photo taken of the goodies you got at the Market, and fill out a raffle ticket.

Plus, we are very excited that our incredible Market poster artist, Addy Wagner will be popping up on Saturday to sell some of her awesome prints. Be sure to stop by her tent to see her work!

Why celebrate National Farmers Market Week?* 

  • Farmers Markets are key for community food access. Since 2017, farmers market and direct marketing farmer redemptions of SNAP benefits have increased by 162 percent.
  • Farmers markets are the future of local food. Farmers markets are business incubators for young farmers; they provide one of the only low-barrier entry points for new farmers, ranchers, and food entrepreneurs allowing them to start small and test new products.
  • Farmers markets fuel local economies. In 2020, approximately 78% of farms selling directly to customers sold all of their directly marketed food within a 100-mile radius of the farm.
  • Farmers markets support conservation, connection and education. Research indicates that by facilitating farmer to consumer interactions, farmers markets shift both purchasing habits of consumers and the growing practices of farmers, leading to the adoption of more sustainable practices.

*Statistics from Farmers Market Coalition 

Be sure to thank all your favorite farmers, makers, and bakers this week for being a part of this incredible farmers market and our local food community! There is a tremendous amount of work that goes into making this Farmers’ Market happen. We thank our vendors, shoppers, volunteers, and BTLT members for their support! Want to learn more about supporting your local farmers’ markets? Check out this blog post.

The Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust Saturday Farmers’ Market runs every Saturday at Crystal Spring Farm from 8:30am-12:30pm from May through October. 

Love Your Local Market

Did you know that Greater Brunswick is home to five farmers markets? They are such an incredible resource for local eaters, and the farms and food producers of the region. Each market is run by a different organization, or group of vendors, which means that there are various ways of supporting each one. Click here to learn more about the individual markets of the region.

Regardless of which market(s) you call your own, or if you’re visiting markets while traveling, here are some easy ways to support them:

  • Shop at markets often! Get to know your farmers, fishermen and food producers.
  • Shop the whole market (meat, veggies, cheese, prepared foods, etc.) and try new foods often.
  • If it’s in season, purchase it at the farmers’ market. Click here to see what’s in season, and some fun accompanying recipes. 
  • Volunteer at the SNAP booth or information booth at your favorite markets. All markets in our region need volunteers right now – reach out via email to let them know you’d like to get involved!
    • Brunswick-Topsham Land Trusts’ Saturday Market at Crystal Spring Farm – market@btlt.org
    • Brunswick Farmers Market – brunswickfmvolunteer@gmail.com
    • Bath Farmers Market – haagpw@gmail.com
    • Bowdoinham Farmers Market – bowdoinhamfoodpantry@gmail.com
    • Brunswick Winter Market, jamison.pacheco@gmail.com
  • Invite your friends and family to the market with you.
  • Donate to the market to help offset the operating cost or purchase market merchandise (hats, bags, shirts, etc). Most markets are run by a host of folks volunteering their time and resources.
  • Bring your own shopping bags and produce bags. And return plant pots, egg crates, onion bags, etc.
  • Talk to your employer about adding farmers markets to their employee wellness plan. Maine has a program called BumperCrop run by the Maine Federation of Farmers’ Markets.

Eating locally is a wonderful way to support the local economy, your community, and a healthy environment through sustainable farming and food production. Get eating folks!

A Berry Exciting Time of Year…

It’s once again blueberry season at Crystal Spring Farm. A portion of the farm on the south side of Pleasant Hill Road consists of a rare natural community of plants known as a sandplain grassland, which is ideal habitat for low-bush blueberries. It’s July, so the blueberries in the barren are ripening now!  

Please note that the Land Trust only owns a small section of the barren. The much larger adjacent property is leased and managed by Seth Kroeck, Crystal Spring’s farm manager, for the commercial sale of organic blueberries. Please do not pick beyond the Land Trust’s clearly marked property boundary. See photo below.

Kroeck described his growing process for us. “Growing blueberries is a two-year cycle. We prune the plants, either by mowing or burning, the spring after the harvest. The next year they regrow and it is on this new growth that they make flowers and then fruit. By dividing the field in two, each season we have one section of plants in regeneration and one ready to harvest.”  

BTLT undertakes a similar management practice, and last spring half of the section open to the public was burned to promote healthy growth of this unique habitat. As a result, it’s looking like there will be a bumper crop of blueberries on the 14 acres that were burned last year!

As a result, this year you will also see that roughly 3.5 acres of the Crystal Spring Farm barrens south of the Blueberry Loop are roped off. Seth Kroeck and the Land Trust are working together to harvest, process, and donate blueberries from this area to folks in our community, so please observe the signs and do not pick in this area. Stay tuned for more information and updates about this later this summer!

The boundary line is marked with metal stakes and signs, and the lone trees in the middle of the field mark part of the boundary. 

Kroeck also noted that “Bees for pollination are rented from Swan’s Honey in Albion. We truck them back and forth, loading in the evenings when the colonies are inside the hives. It takes 30 to 40 hives to pollinate this crop.” There are also a few ‘resident hives’ on the northside of Pleasant Hill Road that help to pollinate the blueberries when they are in flower.  

Mowing, bringing in hives to pollinate, harvesting, and processing are all labor and capital intensive for Kroeck and Crystal Spring Community Farm. But, blueberries have become one of the farms’ most important crops, and can be found in natural food and grocery stores up and down the coast. This significant investment is also why we ask the community to be mindful of only picking in the areas BTLT has set aside for public gathering. 

The massive “barren” at Crystal Spring doesn’t just produce blueberries, though. The area is a rare natural community home to sedges, birds, reptiles, and butterflies that depend on sandy soils and full sunlight to thrive. Once common along the northeastern coast, development and changing land uses have all but eliminated this unique biome, and the Maine Natural Areas Program lists it as “critically imperiled.” The unique habitat is a product of geologic history and human actions. The sand and gravel deposited by melting glaciers at the end of the last ice age provides a level, well-drained base that acidic plants love. Both Native Americans and European settlers used fire deliberately as a way to maintain the area as grassland and promote blueberry production. 

In 2019, BTLT hosted a “bioblitz” at the property to help catalog the many species that call this place home. The recent prescribed burn of the blueberry barrens will help ensure this unique habitat is sustained, and BTLT will carefully monitor the recovery and the species that it has impacted. This year Grasshopper Sparrows and Eastern Meadowlark have been observed in the barren as well as rare sedge, all which are threatened or critically imperiled species that rely on this natural community.

Our blueberry barren is located south of Pleasant Hill Road. To access it, you can park at the Crystal Spring Farm trail parking area and take the East Trail.  Where the East Trail intersects the Blueberry Loop, take a right toward the field and you’ll find blueberries! 

As you enjoy the blueberries and engage in this wonderful rite of summer, please respect a few important rules: 

  • Stay on our property: The map above shows the location of our property boundary. These maps are posted at primary entrances to our property.
  • Park responsibly: While we prefer that people use the parking area described above and walk to the barren, it is also possible to park along Pleasant Hill Road near the gate approximately 0.75 mile from Maine Street. If you park on Pleasant Hill Road: 
  • DO NOT BLOCK THE FARM ROAD OR GATE! The road must be accessible to farm and fire equipment at all times. 
  • Park only on the south side of Pleasant Hill Road (the side the blueberries are on). With cars parked on both sides of the road, pedestrians crossing, runners and bikers, and farm equipment all converging – it makes for a very unsafe situation. 
  • Have fun! And share your best blueberry recipes with us! 

If you have questions, give us a call at 729-7694. Happy picking! 

Winter Garden Workshop Recordings Now Available

We had a great line up of Winter Garden Workshops this year, thanks to our partnership with Curtis Memorial Library, our sponsors Camden National Bank, and all our great speakers.

You can now see videos of all the presentations HERE.

Topics included:

Gardening for Small Spaces, Kate Wallace, Resilience Hub

Kate Wallace is the Programming Director and PDC Facilitator of the Resilience Hub. She facilitates educational experiences, Permablitzes, and designed permaculture systems for clients both independently and through the Resilience Hub. Join Kate to learn all about how to maximize your use of a small garden space. Don’t think you have enough room to grow a tree, vine or tubers? Think again! Let Kate show you her favorite proven tricks.

Food Forest Gardening, Aaron Parker, Edgewood Nursery

A food forest is a way of laying out a landscape to mimic a natural forest, providing food and other human needs with a minimum amount external inputs and maximum benefits to wildlife and the greater environment. Join Aaron Parker of Edgewood Nursery to learn how to better mimic nature to increase the productivity of your plot. Incorporate more perennial foodstuffs, work less on maintenance and reap the benefits of a system that works in harmony with nature’s natural cycles. his workshop will introduce the concepts of ecological niches, analogs, and resource partitioning so you can design your own home scale food forest. To help you implement your design we will also cover best practices for starting a food forest and recommended species to plant. 

Pollinator Gardening, Dev Culver, Common Good Garden Coordinator, TSCG

Join Dev, Common Good Garden Coordinator for BTLT, to learn about the lesser known pollinators, such as moths, the importance of pollinator gardens, what plants attract pollinators and how to manage pollinator gardens to do the least harm to the pollinators themselves.

Gardening for Plant Based Diets, Dave Asmussen, Blue Bell Farm

There are many reasons for choosing to follow a plant–based diet, whether they be humane, environmental, or health oriented. Learn how to grow the types of foods needed for a well rounded diet. Hint: it involves beans! After adventures far and wide through several states, homesteads and farmland, David Asmussen & Meredith Eilers were excited to put down roots in Bowdoinham in 2013 where they grow diverse vegetables, berries and other perennials such as nut crops. Dave is a graduate of MOFGA’s Journey-person program and is proud to be farming on land with an agricultural conservation easement through the Maine Farmland Trust.

BTLT Partners to Bring Food to the Community

It’s been a challenging year for everyone, but for those in our community who struggle to access enough food, this year has been particularly hard. That’s why the Merrymeeting Gleaners (a project of the Merrymeeting Food Council) have been working diligently to assure that as much food as possible is reaching those in need – even in mid-winter, when there is little to glean from local farm fields 

Merrymeeting Gleaners harvests surplus food from 35 local farms and redistribute it to over 30 organizations that support individuals who require help accessing food across 17 towns in the Bath-Brunswick regionDespite facing challenges associated with the need to physically distance, mask, respect the safety needs of farmers and their families, and handle food differently, this year over fifty dedicated gleaning volunteers gathered and harvested almost 52,000 pounds of fresh food from local farm fields and markets to donate to those in need. But they didn’t stop there.  

The Merrymeeting Food Council secured emergency funding from the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation to purchase food to supplement the emergency food system during the pandemic. The Food Council coordinated emergency funding requests and food distributions with other regional partners including MidCoast Hunger Prevention Program and Good Food for Bath to ensure the food needs of all regional partners were met. Merrymeeting Food Council purchased storage crops from local farms to bolster the supply of fresh foods being distributed by the Gleaners. Local produce and ducks were distributed immediately or processed by volunteers (e.g. cut up butternut squash) or turned into soup in partnership with Bessie’s Farm Goods in Freeport. 

In addition, between late December and early February, the Gleaners partnered with Flight Deck Brewing to order nutritious, shelf stable food from Native Maine Produce. This allowed the Gleaners to acquire healthy foods that can easily be stored at room temperature which their partner organizations were having difficulty sourcing for their clients 

“We are so grateful for the partnership with Flight Deck Brewing,” says Merrymeeting Gleaners Coordinator, Kelly Davis. “Working with us to order shelf stable food to supplement the fresh gleaned produce we are donating has allowed us to provide even more support to our partners that are working so hard to meet the increased food needs of our community members.”   

Soon, Food Council leaders were able to work with Native Maine to secure a non-profit discount for the purchases. At that point, the purchasing started to go through one of the Food Council’s fiscal sponsors, Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust (which was already administering the funds) to leverage their non-profit statuswhile deliveries kept arriving at Flight Deck – a huge help because of their existing delivery and storage capacity. 

From Flight Deck, gleaning volunteers distributed the food to those in need across the southern midcoast, including at Mid Coast Community Action Program (Bath, Brunswick and Pejepscot Head Starts), Big Brothers Big Sisters, Wabanaki REACH, Neighborhood Café, River Landing, Richmond Terrace, Bath Housing, Village Clubhouse, Phippsburg Elementary, Family Stone Projects, Bowdoinham Food Pantry, and the Bath Area Food Bank. 

Donna Patrick, Resident Services Coordinator for Riverside Landing in Topsham and Richmond Terrace in Richmond, says she has been so grateful for all the food the Gleaners have provided, and really appreciated them going the extra mile by getting non-perishable items during this season when less is available from local farms. “We manage housing for low income, elderly/disabled adults on a fixed income,” said Patrick. The gleaners deliver to our 36 residents in Topsham and 36 residents in Richmond. This delivery supplements our residents’ diets with healthy, nutritious food they may not otherwise be able to afford. With winter and COVID, food insecurity is a real fear for them.  They have asked me, with tears in their eyes, to pass on their gratitude to all for keeping them safe and so well fed.”    

In total, the emergency funding allowed more than 5,800 pounds of additional food to be distributed to community members facing food insecurity this winter – with roughly one-third of that food having been locally produced.  

Nate Wildes of Flight Deck Brewing helps to load food into volunteer cars after delivery at the brewery.

Merrymeeting Gleaners Coordinator Kelly Davis, and volunteers Kathie Duncan and Rebecca McConnaughey with the food they’ll deliver to the community.

 

The Merrymeeting Gleaners is a program of the Merrymeeting Food Council, which is a collaboration of local organizations working together to take action to increase the production and consumption of local, healthy food. Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust is one of the co-founders and fiscal sponsors of this collaboration.

Learn more at www.merrymeetingfoodcouncil.org or www.btlt.org/mfc  

Merrymeeting Gleaners ~ 2020 Accomplishments!

The Merrymeeting Gleaners are a 100+ person volunteer group that was formed in 2016 as part of Merrymeeting Food Council’s food security work.  Gleaners harvest surplus food from local farms and redistribute it to over 30 organizations that support individuals who require help accessing food in our area.

BTLT is proud to be a partner in this important collaboration to end hunger and food waste in our community. Below is a recent update from the Gleaner’s Coordinator, Kelly Davis, outlining all of the impressive highlights from the season.

——~~~~~——

I think we can all agree that 2020 was a year like no other. Once everything shut down in March we had no idea what to expect. I am happy to say that we have continued to glean every week, we formed new partnerships with farms and distribution sites, and we have seen an increase in volunteers.

Here are the numbers:

  • 51,955.11 Pounds Gleaned and Donated (a new record for us!)
  • 128 Volunteers
  • 2,145 Volunteer Hours
  • 35 Farms and Food Producers
  • 38 Distribution Sites 

In addition to seeing an increase in pounds gleaned, volunteers and distribution sites, we also froze produce that we are now donating along with fresh storage crops. And we are partnering with Bessie’s Farm Goods in Freeport to have soup made from gleaned produce and then donating it to our partners.

This year we received more than just fresh produce. We also received eggs, ducks and seedlings. Over the course of the summer we received donations of over 2,000 seedlings from farms. The seedlings were donated to many of our partners. The timing of the seedling donations could not have been better with the increased interest in home gardening.

In 2020 we moved into a new storage location. Since 2017 we have been fortunate to be able to use space at Maritime Apartments in Bath for storing produce in between deliveries. We are so grateful for that partnership that made such a difference in the amount of produce that we could distribute and the number of partners that were able to receive it. With the increase in the amount of processing and freezing that we are doing we found it necessary to find a larger storage location. The City of Bath worked with us to find the perfect building to meet our needs. With the help of many volunteers we moved into the space at the beginning of December.  We are fortunate that the City of Bath is leasing the space at a very affordable rate and we received a generous donation from the Stone Family Projects for the first 6 months of rent. We will be fundraising for the remaining amount.

With so many businesses and institutions shutting down in March, we saw a very noticeable increase in the need for food. I am so grateful to be a part of an organization that is willing to rise to the occasion and exceed all expectations.

At a time when it would have been so easy to shut ourselves away in our homes and wait for better times, I am so grateful that so many of you chose not to do that! You stepped up and continued giving your time, donating food, and distributing the food to those in need. I am grateful for the support of our umbrella organization, the Merrymeeting Food Council, especially our fiscal sponsors the Kennebec Estuary Land Trust and the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust.

For those of you that have not been able to be as hands on during the pandemic because of health or family reasons, I want to thank you for keeping us in your thoughts and helping to spread the word about our work. There are many ways to be a part of the Merrymeeting Gleaners!

We are looking forward to another exciting year of increasing access to healthy local food. I hope that you all have a healthy and peaceful 2021.

Happy New Year,

Kelly Davis

Coordinator

Merrymeeting Gleaners

 

WANT TO GET INVOLVED?

Merrymeeting Gleaners is always looking for volunteers, if you are interested in contributing let us know!

Here are some ways in which you could support us: gleaning on the farm or at the farmers’ market, delivering produce (using personal vehicle), administrative assistant, fundraising and grant writing, booth volunteer at events, labeling jars post-processing, photographer, programmer/IT, PR volunteer promoting gleaning and writing press releases, and more!

Email: merrymeetinggleaners@gmail.com

BTLT Farmers’ Market Changes

BTLT’s Farmers’ Market open every Saturday, starting May 2, at Brunswick High School, 116 Maquoit Road in Brunswick, from 9:00-12:30 for the general public. From 8:30-9:00 we will allow only high-risk populations to shop.

The Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust (BTLT) has hosted one of the busiest, best-loved farmers’ markets in the state for over two decades at our picturesque Crystal Spring Farm (CSF) in Brunswick. This year, however, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we will start our season hosting Saturday market at the Brunswick High School. 

“We know how important this market is for getting food to our community and for our farmers’ and producers’ livelihoods,” said BTLT Director of Programs Nikkilee (Lee) Cataldo. “There was never a question of if we would open the market this season. Just a question of how we could do it safely.” 

Deemed “essential businesses,” farmers’ markets across the state are scrambling to figure out how to get local food to consumers, while keeping both vendors and customers safe. The State of Maine and Maine Federation of Farmers Markets have provided valuable guidance, but every market is unique and poses its own challenges in the era of COVID-19. Something we knew we needed for the market was more space to allow for adequate distancing between vendors and customers. 

The extensive parking lots at Brunswick High School allow for vendors and customers to spread out more than the typically crowded Crystal Spring Farm market site. “People have been asking for years why we don’t spread our market out in the expansive fields at CSF, and I’m sure they will ask this year too,” Cataldo commented. “But everyone forgets – the thing that makes the farm so wonderful for hosting the market is also what keeps us on the market green – active agriculture. Those fields were conserved to be farmed, not to be more parking,” 

It is not just the location that will be different. We are implementing a host of other precautions we want the community to be aware of, including: 

  • From 8:30-9:00 the market will only be open for shopping by high-risk populations including seniors, the immunocompromised, pregnant women, people with disabilities, and caregivers; 
  • There will be no outhouse available to customers; and 
  • The number of customers permitted in the market at any time will be limited, so attendees should be prepared to wait and/or come at mid- to late-morning, times that tend to be less busy. 

In addition, we are asking all customers to: 

  • Follow all CDC guidelines
  • Stay home if you feel ill or have been around someone who is sick
  • Wear a mask at all times
  • Bring hand sanitizer
  • Stay at least six feet away from others
  • Send only one person per family to shop 
  • Keep your visit as brief as possible to assure everyone has an opportunity to shop.

 EBT/SNAP and Harvest Bucks will still be available at the market. 

Vendors are also adapting to the move with adjustments to booth layout, how they handle payment, and spacing guidelines. All have been asked to provide pre-order options (learn more about each vendor’s availability at www.btlt.org/farmers-market) and grab-and-go to keep customers moving efficiently through the market. “I am heartened by the response of our vendors who are ready to step up to the plate despite the significant adjustments to our regular market procedures,” said Market Manager, Jacqui Koopman.  “A few of our vendors will begin a few weeks later in the season, but most will be with us on opening day.”

We are so grateful to the Town of Brunswick and the Brunswick School Department for the use of the BHS grounds, and for figuring everything out so quickly. “Having the roads, parking lots, and space of the high school is going to make a huge difference in being able to have a safe but robust market for our community.  We couldn’t have done it without their support,” said Cataldo. She also noted how different it will be not to start the season with the “celebratory” feeling of community coming together at CSF.  “We are all looking forward to being back at Crystal Spring Farm, but for now, we’re just glad to be able to continue to support our local food economy and help assure access to fresh, healthy food for our community.  And at least market shoppers will be able to look out across the blueberry fields to Crystal Spring Farm property!”